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Ken1R
Community Member

My internet provider uses fiber optic service.  It is capable of 1000 mbps service.  Will my Google 4 Pk WiFi AC1200 Dual Band Home WiFi be able to handle this service?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

MichaelP
Platinum Product Expert
Platinum Product Expert

Hello @Ken1R 

I know plenty of people use Google WiFi systems with 1Gbps internet service. But, I would caution you to have different expectations when it comes to performance. For Ethernet-connected devices (i.e., devices connected via the primary Google WiFi unit's LAN Ethernet port either directly or through an unmanaged Ethernet switch), you should be able to achieve near-gigabit speeds as long as the cables, devices, and any switches are working properly and rated for that speed. But, WiFi isn't going to go that fast under most conditions. Most devices have WiFi interfaces that can't go that fast to start with. Google WiFI has an AC1200 2x2 WiFi interface, which is theoretically capable of communicating at 866Mbps over 5GHz, but that would only happen at very short range (same room, no obstructions) and doesn't account for the very high overhead WiFi has. I would expect something closer to 400+ Mbps at short range from a typical device that also supports 2x2 (two streams). Some devices only support 1x1, though, so they'd be half of that speed. From another room, this speed will fall off dramatically. One or two rooms away and the speed will be more like 200+ Mbps to a 2x2 device.

The next issue is the impact of using multiple access points (e.g., three secondaries in a 4 pack). They connect to the primary using the same 5GHz radio. Since they'll be one or two rooms away from the primary, they'll be limited to how fast they can talk to it. That will also put them closer to more distant clients, which will increase the speed those clients can talk to the nearest access point, but that traffic still has to go over the same channel again, and at the lower speed. In short, a mesh system like this is great for expanding the usable coverage area, but it does so by trading peak performance for a larger coverage area.

If you really care about performance, use Ethernet for everything you possibly can, especially streaming video systems / smart TVs, gaming consoles, and desktop computers. This will leave as much WiFi capacity as possible for those devices that can't use Ethernet. They are unlikely to be able to saturate your gigabit connection, though.

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4 REPLIES 4

MichaelP
Platinum Product Expert
Platinum Product Expert

Hello @Ken1R 

I know plenty of people use Google WiFi systems with 1Gbps internet service. But, I would caution you to have different expectations when it comes to performance. For Ethernet-connected devices (i.e., devices connected via the primary Google WiFi unit's LAN Ethernet port either directly or through an unmanaged Ethernet switch), you should be able to achieve near-gigabit speeds as long as the cables, devices, and any switches are working properly and rated for that speed. But, WiFi isn't going to go that fast under most conditions. Most devices have WiFi interfaces that can't go that fast to start with. Google WiFI has an AC1200 2x2 WiFi interface, which is theoretically capable of communicating at 866Mbps over 5GHz, but that would only happen at very short range (same room, no obstructions) and doesn't account for the very high overhead WiFi has. I would expect something closer to 400+ Mbps at short range from a typical device that also supports 2x2 (two streams). Some devices only support 1x1, though, so they'd be half of that speed. From another room, this speed will fall off dramatically. One or two rooms away and the speed will be more like 200+ Mbps to a 2x2 device.

The next issue is the impact of using multiple access points (e.g., three secondaries in a 4 pack). They connect to the primary using the same 5GHz radio. Since they'll be one or two rooms away from the primary, they'll be limited to how fast they can talk to it. That will also put them closer to more distant clients, which will increase the speed those clients can talk to the nearest access point, but that traffic still has to go over the same channel again, and at the lower speed. In short, a mesh system like this is great for expanding the usable coverage area, but it does so by trading peak performance for a larger coverage area.

If you really care about performance, use Ethernet for everything you possibly can, especially streaming video systems / smart TVs, gaming consoles, and desktop computers. This will leave as much WiFi capacity as possible for those devices that can't use Ethernet. They are unlikely to be able to saturate your gigabit connection, though.

View solution in original post

Ken1R
Community Member

Thanks again … information was on target . Results experienced was much the same as indicated in email.

Jeff
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hey, Ken1R.

It looks like with MichaelP's help you were able to find some answers here. I just wanted to check in real fast to see if you were all set or if there's anything else I can help with. If you still need some help, just let me know.

Thanks!

Jeff
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hi, everyone.
As we haven't had any activity here recently I'm going to go ahead and close the thread. If you have more to add, feel free to start a new discussion.
Thanks