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Google Mesh Network WiFi system

BandA
Community Member

Is the older Google mesh Network-Wi-Fi system still supported?  We have inconsistent performance of connecting to the internet using 6 devices strung out (Daisy chained) from one end of our home to the other end with the main Google mesh router hard wired to our modem in the middle of the house. 
Are these Google mesh devices out of date?

1 Recommended Answer

MichaelP
Diamond Product Expert
Diamond Product Expert

Hello @BandA 

The "Google WiFi" and "Nest WiFi" products are both still sold and supported. I would suggest thinking a bit about how many devices you need and how to best have them placed, though. It sounds like your primary unit (the one wired to your cable modem) is already in a good spot (the middle of your home). Next, I would place secondaries no more than one or two rooms away from the primary (in any direction, including up or down). You want them to be close enough they can all get a strong 5GHz connection directly to the primary. From those locations, they will provide both 5GHz and 2.4GHz connectivity to more distant clients. You may find you don't need all 5 secondary units deployed, depending on your home.

Trying to make them "daisy chain" is unlikely to work well in my experience. They prefer fewer "hops", so if a secondary can get through directly to the primary at all – even slowly – it will do that instead of going through an intermediate unit.

You will want to run a mesh test using the Google Home app to get a feel for how well each secondary can communicate. You really want all of them to have a "great" rating on that test. If any of them don't, it will impact the performance of clients connected to that unit, and will also impact the performance of simultaneous traffic from clients on other units.

In addition, if you have Google WiFi units, they include Ethernet ports. This can help in a couple of ways. First, you can use those ports to connect nearby clients that also support Ethernet directly to one of the Google WiFi secondaries. This gets client-to-secondary traffic off of the shared WiFi channel. The second way it can help is if you can connect a secondary back to the primary unit's LAN Ethernet port (using one or more inexpensive, unmanaged Ethernet "switches" to make more ports available). This can be a huge benefit, since it lets that "wired" secondary talk to the primary via Ethernet instead of relying on the 5GHz WiFi mesh interconnect. This would let you place that secondary just about anywhere you want, including spots quite far from the primary (even in an outbuilding if you have the required wiring between them). For a large home, or one that has interior walls made from dense materials like concrete, brick, or plaster, wiring secondaries is probably the single biggest improvement you can make. Unfortunately, the "Nest WiFi" product only includes Ethernet ports on the Nest WiFi Router units – the Nest WiFi Point units can't be wired.

I hope some of the above information proves useful.

View Recommended Answer in original post

6 REPLIES 6

MichaelP
Diamond Product Expert
Diamond Product Expert

Hello @BandA 

The "Google WiFi" and "Nest WiFi" products are both still sold and supported. I would suggest thinking a bit about how many devices you need and how to best have them placed, though. It sounds like your primary unit (the one wired to your cable modem) is already in a good spot (the middle of your home). Next, I would place secondaries no more than one or two rooms away from the primary (in any direction, including up or down). You want them to be close enough they can all get a strong 5GHz connection directly to the primary. From those locations, they will provide both 5GHz and 2.4GHz connectivity to more distant clients. You may find you don't need all 5 secondary units deployed, depending on your home.

Trying to make them "daisy chain" is unlikely to work well in my experience. They prefer fewer "hops", so if a secondary can get through directly to the primary at all – even slowly – it will do that instead of going through an intermediate unit.

You will want to run a mesh test using the Google Home app to get a feel for how well each secondary can communicate. You really want all of them to have a "great" rating on that test. If any of them don't, it will impact the performance of clients connected to that unit, and will also impact the performance of simultaneous traffic from clients on other units.

In addition, if you have Google WiFi units, they include Ethernet ports. This can help in a couple of ways. First, you can use those ports to connect nearby clients that also support Ethernet directly to one of the Google WiFi secondaries. This gets client-to-secondary traffic off of the shared WiFi channel. The second way it can help is if you can connect a secondary back to the primary unit's LAN Ethernet port (using one or more inexpensive, unmanaged Ethernet "switches" to make more ports available). This can be a huge benefit, since it lets that "wired" secondary talk to the primary via Ethernet instead of relying on the 5GHz WiFi mesh interconnect. This would let you place that secondary just about anywhere you want, including spots quite far from the primary (even in an outbuilding if you have the required wiring between them). For a large home, or one that has interior walls made from dense materials like concrete, brick, or plaster, wiring secondaries is probably the single biggest improvement you can make. Unfortunately, the "Nest WiFi" product only includes Ethernet ports on the Nest WiFi Router units – the Nest WiFi Point units can't be wired.

I hope some of the above information proves useful.

BandA
Community Member

Greetings Michael,

Thank you for your thoughtful response.  It is very helpful, especially details about 'daisy chaining', and how secondary  units will default to connections with the primary, even if they are weak signals. We're going to try a more recent generation (WiFi 6) Router/modem and see if that helps, and reset/reinstall our Google mesh units to work on the new Google Home app.  Hopefully that will help.  IF not we may apply the hard-wired approach.   

So great to have such knowledgeable people like you accessible.

Thanks,
Bruce & Anita (BandA)

LovelyM
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hi BandA, 

It's our pleasure! We're glad that we are able to assist you. If you have other questions in mind, don't hesitate to let us know so we can address them right away. 

Cheers,
Lovely

AbigailF
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hey BandA,

Checking back in should you still have some questions here. Let us know by replying to this thread. 

Best, 
Abi

AbigailF
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hello BandA,

We haven't heard from you in a while so we'll be locking this thread if there is no update within 24 hours. If you have any new issues, updates or just a discussion topic, feel free to start a new thread in the Community.

Regards, 
Abi

LovelyM
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hey everyone,

I appreciate your thorough answer, @MichaelP.

@BandA, thanks for reaching out. It looks like MichaelP already covered everything, but I just want to add that only Google Wifi (2nd), Nest Wifi router and point and Nest Wifi Pro are available for purchase. The Google Wifi (1st gen), although still supported, is already phased out. The only device that we no longer support is the OnHub. 

Let me know if you still encounter issues so I can further help. 

Regards,
Lovely