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Main point connected wireless to point 2, point 2 wired to point 3

Kalle_123
Community Member

The main point is meshed with point 2 hand here I have a strong signal. Point 3 is located in the basement and closest to point 2 with a week mesh connection.

Is it anyway that I can increase the signal strength in point 3 by hardwire it to point 2.  If so which port do I on point 2 and 3?

 

1 Recommended Answer

MichaelP
Diamond Product Expert
Diamond Product Expert

Hello @Kalle_123 

The nodes in the mesh will use the shortest path to get their traffic to its destination. So, if your point 3 can get through to the main point directly, it will do so – even if it's a relatively weak connection. Going through point 2 might or might not be faster, since any traffic point 3 sends to point 2 will have to go back out over the same channel again to get to the main point. This is why the placement advice recommends trying to put the main point as close to the center of your home as possible with mesh secondary points placed one or two rooms away from there where they can provide coverage to more distant clients.

As for your second question, this gets somewhat esoteric. The short answer is that connecting point 2 to point 3 via Ethernet won't work reliably. The longer answer for why that's the case has to do with how the mesh protocol works. It is only running over the 5GHz WiFi interface – it doesn't run over Ethernet. So, when you connect two nodes via Ethernet that are already connected to each other via the mesh network, it creates a traffic loop. To break that loop, Google WiFi uses the Spanning Tree Protocol to detect the redundant path and disable one of the interfaces on one of the two nodes involved in the loop. The interface it disables will be the mesh interface, which means that node can no longer communicate with the rest of the mesh. If that happens on point 3, it might work. But, if it happens on point 2, then bad things will happen, since all of point 2's client traffic will go over Ethernet to point 3 and from there over the (weak) mesh connection to the main point. That would not be ideal. Unfortunately, since STP is a peer-to-peer protocol, we can't force it to pick point 3 rather than point 2 – it will essentially be random, and it might be different every time it powers up.

I hope some of these details help. The best advice I can give is to run Ethernet from the main point to at least point 3, and preferably point 2 as well. That will provide the best possible performance without changing the placement.

View Recommended Answer in original post

3 REPLIES 3

MichaelP
Diamond Product Expert
Diamond Product Expert

Hello @Kalle_123 

The nodes in the mesh will use the shortest path to get their traffic to its destination. So, if your point 3 can get through to the main point directly, it will do so – even if it's a relatively weak connection. Going through point 2 might or might not be faster, since any traffic point 3 sends to point 2 will have to go back out over the same channel again to get to the main point. This is why the placement advice recommends trying to put the main point as close to the center of your home as possible with mesh secondary points placed one or two rooms away from there where they can provide coverage to more distant clients.

As for your second question, this gets somewhat esoteric. The short answer is that connecting point 2 to point 3 via Ethernet won't work reliably. The longer answer for why that's the case has to do with how the mesh protocol works. It is only running over the 5GHz WiFi interface – it doesn't run over Ethernet. So, when you connect two nodes via Ethernet that are already connected to each other via the mesh network, it creates a traffic loop. To break that loop, Google WiFi uses the Spanning Tree Protocol to detect the redundant path and disable one of the interfaces on one of the two nodes involved in the loop. The interface it disables will be the mesh interface, which means that node can no longer communicate with the rest of the mesh. If that happens on point 3, it might work. But, if it happens on point 2, then bad things will happen, since all of point 2's client traffic will go over Ethernet to point 3 and from there over the (weak) mesh connection to the main point. That would not be ideal. Unfortunately, since STP is a peer-to-peer protocol, we can't force it to pick point 3 rather than point 2 – it will essentially be random, and it might be different every time it powers up.

I hope some of these details help. The best advice I can give is to run Ethernet from the main point to at least point 3, and preferably point 2 as well. That will provide the best possible performance without changing the placement.

Jeff
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hi, Kalle_123.
I just wanted to jump in real fast. It looks like MichaelP was able to help you with a good bit of info here. I just wanted to make sure that you had this sorted out or to see if you still needed some help. If you need anything, just let me know.
Thanks.

Jeff
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hi, everyone.
As we haven't had any activity here recently I'm going to go ahead and close the thread. If you have more to add, feel free to start a new discussion. Thanks, MichaelP for all your input here.
Thanks