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Nest Protect mesh in multi-family apartment building?

Espen
Community Member

Hi

We are a building with ten unit across five floors, and our old and wired common fire detectors and alarms are due for replacement. We're looking into less costly, more flexible solutions, preferably wireless. The interlinked sensor/alarm solutions we've looked at so far don't come with any app or other kind of dashboard that gives a manager the ability to monitor each sensor. We've experienced earlier that tenants can't be trusted to give correct information about wether they have mandatory sensors, or replace batteries regularly.

So our question is; is Nest Protect a possible solution? Does anyone know how this pilot is going? Platform is not an issue. We'd rather not have this linked to one individuals private Google account either.

https://stratisiot.com/google-nest-launches-first-pilot-in-multifamily-rental-apartment/

9 REPLIES 9

KMJU
Community Member

Similar to the above, I own a condo in a six-unit building.  The State fire code requires hardwired combination smoke/CO detectors that have a built-in, sealed, 10-year battery backup.  I'm finding conflicting information on whether the Nest Protect backup batteries are sealed or removable.  Hoping someone can provide an accurate answer.  Thanks.

DanCoco
Community Member

Nest uses AAAs. Not sealed. For both use cases being apartment buildings, additional fire code requirements may come into play, both as a multi tenant, but also commercial property. (Like does your neighborhood require automatic alarms at that size?)

 

It is not possible to use a Google Workspace account with Nest, a free gmail is required. You could make one for this. I dont know if multiple logins are allowed at the same time. Protect is not in Google Home. The function of the nest app is very limited now, alert notifications are delayed or inaccurate, and i cannot initiate a test from the app without being in bluetooth range. (This may be a network layout issue, but ive abandoned the app alltogether.)

 

In my state, landlords are required to provide install and maintain detectors, including battery replacements in non sealed models. You are right that tenants cant be trusted to even tell you they have a peoblem with one (if they havent ripped the batteries out after bad cooking)

In your research, definitely give a few alarm companies a call for an estimate, even just to get pricing. Adding up all the Nests, plus electrician labor for install may end up at a similar pricing, when a commercial system would be designed better for that size building.

Espen
Community Member

Thanks for your reply.

The cheapest estimate we got for a commercial system from a reputable company is $16 000 (converted) for 10 units + cellar.

Jhonleanmel
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hi folks,

 

Thanks for posting and the interest with Nest Protect.

 

Nest Protects connect wirelessly using a Nest-developed protocol called Weave that lets Nest Protects communicate with one another safely and securely without an active Wi-Fi connection.

 

Weave uses 802.15.4 and Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n to create reliable, flexible, secure and low-power communication between Protects.

You can think of the 802.11b/g/n protocol as the connection that communicates with the outside world and performs tasks like automatically updating Nest Protect software or allowing you to get mobile notifications on your phone. You can think of the 802.15.4 protocol as the low-power connection that lets Nest Protects communicate with each other.

 

This means your Protects can continue to talk to one another, and can let you know when smoke or carbon monoxide is detected in other parts of the home, even if your Wi-Fi network goes down. Check this link for more details.

 

Best,

Mel

Ebedia
Community Specialist
Community Specialist

Hello there,

It's us again. I'm bumping up this thread to ensure that everything is covered here. Were you able to read the information and check the link that Mel has shared above? In case you have an update, you know where to find us.

I appreciate the help, Mel.
 
Regards,
Emerson

Espen
Community Member

The information Mel shared was very generic, and didn't really address my questions.

DanCoco
Community Member

Please do not lock this thread. It is not resolved or answered. It should remain visible for others to reference.

KMJU
Community Member

Agree that the information shared so far is pretty much generic and none of the responses provided a specific answer to the original question.  But after drilling deep down into the Maryland fire code, it appears that the non-sealed backup batteries in the hard-wired Nest Protect are OK (which is my circumstance) while battery-only models must 10-year sealed, and tamper-proof.  Hope this helps anyone else looking for clarification.

Espen
Community Member

Guess I'll just see if I can find updates regarding this pilot announced in 2019 
https://www.businessinsider.com/google-nest-launches-first-pilot-greystar-multifamily-rental-apartme...