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Wifi Pro - cable setup

kynde22
Community Member

Hi Forum,

I have ordered the Wifi Pro and now try to find out best way to set it up in our home.

Our layout: Cable DSL modem in the centre of the house - where current wifi router is located.

From same room I have 2 cables going to office and living room - in each room I have switches, for multiple wired connections (printer, pc dock, tv, Nintendo Switch, PS3 etc.)

My question is: Should I connect the new Google Wifi Pro units to the cables in office & living room - or just let them connect wirelessly to the main Google hub at the modem?

If I connect them with cable - should it then be to WAN or LAN port?

Should they be between the switch or as a unit connected to the switch?

 

I hope my question makes sense. 

Martin

 

1 Recommended Answer

David_K
Platinum Product Expert
Platinum Product Expert

They are designed to mesh wirelessly using the 6 GHz band, most people don't need to hardwire them. You would typically only hardwire them if you see poor performance due to your home's layout or construction.

If you're going to hardwire any of your Wifi points, it's strongly recommended that you hardwire all of them. If you don't, you'll create a disjointed setup much more likely to cause problems that are very hard to diagnose. It doesn't matter whether you use the WAN or LAN port on your secondary points to hardwire them.

It should look like this:

Modem -> Primary Wifi point -> Switch -> Wifi Point -> Switch -> Wired devices
                                                                            -> Wifi Point -> Switch -> Wired devices

You can also do this:

Modem -> Primary Wifi point -> Switch -> Switch -> Wifi Point
                                                                                               -> Wired devices

                                                                            -> Switch -> Wifi Point
                                                                                               -> Wired devices                       


For switches, we recommend using an unmanaged switch or configuring a managed switch to disable Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and forward Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) when STP is disabled.  This will avoid technical issues with some managed switches relating to routing and network loops.
                                      

View Recommended Answer in original post

1 REPLY 1

David_K
Platinum Product Expert
Platinum Product Expert

They are designed to mesh wirelessly using the 6 GHz band, most people don't need to hardwire them. You would typically only hardwire them if you see poor performance due to your home's layout or construction.

If you're going to hardwire any of your Wifi points, it's strongly recommended that you hardwire all of them. If you don't, you'll create a disjointed setup much more likely to cause problems that are very hard to diagnose. It doesn't matter whether you use the WAN or LAN port on your secondary points to hardwire them.

It should look like this:

Modem -> Primary Wifi point -> Switch -> Wifi Point -> Switch -> Wired devices
                                                                            -> Wifi Point -> Switch -> Wired devices

You can also do this:

Modem -> Primary Wifi point -> Switch -> Switch -> Wifi Point
                                                                                               -> Wired devices

                                                                            -> Switch -> Wifi Point
                                                                                               -> Wired devices                       


For switches, we recommend using an unmanaged switch or configuring a managed switch to disable Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and forward Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) when STP is disabled.  This will avoid technical issues with some managed switches relating to routing and network loops.